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Jessica Kurtz

Want to save money on your theatre trip to NYC?

July 24th, 2012 by Jessica Kurtz

Me jazzing it up during last month's trip to NYC.

Headed to NYC sometime soon? It’s the best city on Earth, but it can come with a big price tag! Here are a couple tips on how to save money on theatre tickets without having to wait in the TKTS line.

-Head on over to http://www.playbill.com/celebritybuzz/article/82428-Broadway-Rush-Lottery-and-Standing-Room-Only-Policies and review the Rush, Lottery, and Standing Room only ticket Policies. This link will give you all the latest information on which shows currently have a rush ticket policy. Rush usually happens right when the box office is opening (usually 10 a.m.) or two hours prior to the curtain. Some policies will be student rush only or lottery rush (meaning they will pull names of out a hat), so make sure to read the fine print.

-Not a student? If you’re in NYC by yourself – head on over to the rush line and see if anyone is only purchasing one ticket. You never know when someone might be willing to buy an extra one for you with their student ID.

-Don’t assume that the box office sold out of rush tickets right at 10 a.m. I just went to NYC in May and went up an hour before curtain and they still had rush tickets available. If you’re really wanting to see something though – make sure to get to the box office early to get in line for rush tickets.

-Don’t hesitate to ask the box office if they have any ticket specials going on. You never know if they are trying to fill seats!

New York, New York, oh how I love thee!

-TKTS Booth is another option for tickets. The lines tend to be long and the discount is not as cheap as rush tickets, but it is still a discount! 

If you’re really wanting to see THAT ONE SHOW THAT IS THE MOST TALKED ABOUT SHOW OF EVER AND EVER – then I would suggestion biting the bullet and just buying the tickets for full price. You wouldn’t want to get all the way there and not be able to see it. (I mean – I guess that just means you would have to make another trip, right?!)

I love using this system when I’m in the city and I’m on a mission to see as many shows as I can. It saves me a lot of money and I usually have no problem getting to see the shows that I want.

Have a great trip!

 

Jessica Kurtz is Seattle Rep’s Major Gifts Manager and lover of all things New York. 

Seattle Repertory Theatre

Theatre for Life: Don’t miss out on your chance to win!

July 17th, 2012 by Seattle Repertory Theatre

Win Theatre for Life! Join us at Seattle Rep on August 18 for the chance to win!

It’s time to celebrate our 50th Anniversary, and we want you to be a part of it! So what better way to celebrate than by giving away Theatre For Life? Complete a scavenger hunt for the chance to win 2 lifelong subscriptions to Seattle Rep! 

Theatre for Life: A Theatrical Scavenger Hunt
Saturday, August 18, 2012, 12 p.m.

Scavenger Hunt & Block Party all afternoon…
Food Trucks! Drinks! Music! Games! Prizes!

How do I win?

Arrive at Seattle Rep at noon and enter to compete in our scavenger hunt to win Theatre For Life. You’ll be given a booklet that will guide you to eight show-specific locations at Seattle Center. At each booth, you’ll perform a task related to a play in our 50th Anniversary season and receive a stamp after completing the challenge. After you’ve visited all eight stations, you’ll return to Seattle Rep and be entered to win the grand prize. 

What else is happening that day besides the scavenger hunt?

We’re throwing a block party! You know…food trucks, drinks, music, games. The whole shebang. It’s a time to hang out with fellow theatre lovers, enjoy the Seattle summer, and learn more about our upcoming shows. 

The scavenger hunt kicks off at noon, and the party should begin around 1:30 p.m. at Seattle Rep.

Can I win prizes other than Theatre for Life?

Yes! While only one winner will receive the grand prize of Theatre for Life, there are plenty of other door prizes to take home! And you don’t have to compete in the hunt to be eligible for the other prizes. So join us! 

How can I learn more?

Sign-up for e-mail updates via our website. We’ll be rolling out more details about the scavenger hunt, party, and prizes over the next month so stay in the loop!

And don’t forget to join the Theatre for Life Facebook event and invite your friends. See you August 18th!

 

If you have questions, please comment on this blog post or email [email protected] 

Learn more: www.seattlerep.org/TFL

 

 

Seattle Repertory Theatre

The Belly Rules the Mind: Eat at the New Armory

June 26th, 2012 by Seattle Repertory Theatre

food court

A rendering of the new Armory/Center House! (Many of these renovations have already occured).

Venturing down to the Seattle Center soon to enjoy summer festivals and the Next 50 celebration? Then don’t miss out on the chance to check out the newly revamped food court at the Centerhouse (now called The Armory).

Now you may be wondering–why is Seattle Rep even talking about this? Let’s put it this way…the plethora of mouth-watering restaurants in the neighborhood makes it hard for our employees to honor that sack lunch they brought to work this morning. And besides, everybody loves finding a quick and tasty bite!

The revamped Armory isn’t your typical food court; some good stuff moved in recently and more will be coming soon! Think Eltana (wood-fired bagel cafe), Pie (savory and sweet flaky treats), Sweet Treats (think you can guess what this is), MOD PizzaCeres Roasting CompanySkillet, Dante’s Inferno Dogs, The Confectional, Bigfood (flatbread sandwiches, yum!) and Bean Sprout (health-focused cafe and kids’ cooking school). 

Kudos to Seattle Center for the revamp and providing folks with healthier options and more delicious choices. We’re thinking it will come in handy for those patrons this upcoming season who need  a quick bite before the show. (We definitely recommend trying the Chicken Pot Pie at Pie). 

There’s a Spanish proverb that says, “The belly rules the mind.”  Now go forth and eat!

 

 

Seattle Repertory Theatre

Meet Playwright Stephanie Timm

June 14th, 2012 by Seattle Repertory Theatre

Seattle Rep Writers Group playwright Stephanie Timm.

This Friday, June 15, marks the final staged reading in the Inaugural Writers Group Showcase.  Come see Stephanie Timm’s new play Rats in the Garden of Eden at the Rep’s PONCHO Forum at 3 p.m.–it’s free and open to the public!

About the play:

Rats in the Garden of Eden by Stephanie Timm, directed by Kathleen Collins
When Pearl shows up at her younger sister Opal’s doorstep with a suitcase and a box of “sensual products” to sell after a long, mysterious absence, she finds Opal living in an insular world of romance novels and poetry. Rats in the Garden of Eden explores what happens when someone has to choose between fantasy or reality—one leads to madness, the other to inevitable disappointment.

Read below for a little snippet about Stephanie and her new work. 

SRT: What inspired you to write Rats in the Garden of Eden?
A lot of little kernels inspired the play. I collect quirky news articles, and had one about a rat in a baby’s crib, and I got to thinking how that would affect that child growing up, dealing with a severe cosmetic abnormality like that. I was also inspired by True West by Sam Shepherd and Lonesome West by Martin McDonagh (which I think was inspired by True West). Both of these are about brothers, and I thought it’d be interesting to see that competitive dynamic played out between sisters. In many ways I think competition between sisters and between women is much more fierce and can be much more brutal.

SRT: How long have you been a playwright, and how did you get into playwriting?
In 1999, when I moved up to Seattle after graduating from Willamette University, I wanted to be an actor. I found it very challenging to find contemporary monologues for women my age to audition with. So I started writing those parts, first in a short, ten minute solo piece, then my first play The Frog, which I acted in. After being in two of my shows, I was totally in love with the writing and not the acting aspect. Ever since, I always write roles that I could play, roles for my “type” even though I don’t ever intend to act again. I want to always be creating good roles for women.

SRT: What do you like to write about?
I write a lot about the divided self. I am interested in those contradictory aspects of people, including myself.

SRT: What’s the best and/or worst advice you’ve received about writing?
The best advice I got about writing was when I went and saw Anna Quindlen read from a new novel. I remember she said, “If I sit around and wait for inspiration, I’ll never write anything. It’s when you ARE writing that you get inspired.” I have found that to be absolutely true. It’s when I’m in there, with the page, writing something that’s usually really bad, that I get the good idea.

The worst writing advice I ever got was from a teacher of mine who said, “I don’t give two shits what anyone else says about your draft. You need to listen to ME.” I think the most detrimental thing for someone’s work is a dictatorial teacher who insists they know what’s best for your play, instead of equipping you with tools to use and think for yourself when they are no longer around.

SRT: Tell us something quirky about yourself.
I’m an introvert posing as an extrovert.

SRT: What’s next for you?
I have been commissioned, along with composer David Austen, to write a new musical for 5th Avenue Theatre, as part of their brand new Alhadeff New Works Program. I am absolutely thrilled! In collaboration with composer Albert Evans, I wrote Rosie the Riveter! for their Adventure Musical Theatre program, and I had a great experience. I never saw myself writing musicals, but now that I’m doing it, I must say that I love it. Especially when I have such amazing collaborators!

Seattle Repertory Theatre

Stuck on what to get Dad? Try a SRT Gift Card

June 13th, 2012 by Seattle Repertory Theatre

Stuck on what to give Dad this weekend for Father’s Day? Or how about what to give that recent graduate, that soon-to-be newlywed couple, or the upcoming birthday girl?

Seattle Rep gift certificates make the perfect gift and are available through our box office (206-443-2222) or website. The best part? They never expire and can be used throughout our exciting 50th Anniversary season, highlighted below. . .

Pullman Porter Blues by Cheryl L. West—a world premiere production

A captivating coming of age story—woven with live blues music—that follows three generations of porters as they confront dark secrets from their past and tough truths about their future together. 

The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

An imaginative and intimate take on Tennessee Williams’ shattering classic, in which an aging Southern Belle longs for her youth and dreams of a better life for her children.

Inspecting Carol by Daniel Sullivan and the Seattle Repertory Theatre Resident Company

This quirky Seattle Rep classic goes behind the scenes at a struggling theatre’s annual slapdash production of A Christmas Carol—a hilarious spoof that makes for a night at the theatre that is anything but show business as usual. 

American Buffalo by David Mamet

Set in a run-down junk shop, three men of great ambition and low morals plan a heist of a customer’s valuable coin collection in Mamet’s modern masterpiece. 

Photograph 51 by Anna Ziegler

An intriguing portrait of British scientist Rosalind Franklin and her—often overlooked—role in the discovery of DNA’s double helix structure. A complex tale of how a courageous woman operated in a field dominated by men. 

Good People by David Lindsay-Abaire

This Tony-nominated New York hit is an insightful comedy of class and culture that focuses on Margie, a single mother from the wrong side of the tracks who seeks a fresh start with an old flame.  

Boeing-Boeing by Marc Camoletti, adapted by Beverley Cross

It’s the 1960s and swinging bachelor Bernard couldn’t be happier: he’s juggling three stewardess fiancés at his flat in Paris. But his fun soon turns to chaos in this riotous farce when all three arrive in town at the same time! 

Visit our website for more info about the 50th Anniversary season and buying gift certificates!

Seattle Repertory Theatre

Playwright Profile: Meet Al Frank

May 31st, 2012 by Seattle Repertory Theatre

Seattle Rep Writers Group playwright Al Frank.

Stop by Seattle Rep this Friday, June 1 at 3 p.m. to catch the FREE staged reading of Al Frank’s Ain’t No Place Like Home in our PONCHO Forum. This reading marks the fourth new work presented during our Inaugural Seattle Rep Writers Group showcase, which will present again on June 15. 

About the play: It’s late June and Seattle is heating up. People camping in the I-5 greenbelt known as ‘the jungle’ worry about change. With no place else to go, they’re hoping a peaceful summer will keep them out of sight– at least until after the fireworks.

We asked Al to tell us more about himself and his new play.

SRT: What inspired you to write Ain’t No Place Like Home?

I was waiting at the foot of the Dearborn exit from I-5 South for the 2 a.m. traffic light to change when a vision of a homeless camp in the nearby brush sprung to life. More characters than I could accommodate auditioned to participate in the drama. Eight of them, loosely based on homeless people I had encountered in my neighborhoods, got the parts.

SRT: How long have you been a playwright, and how did you get into playwriting?

For a number of years I listened to a close friend discuss his work as a dramatist in great detail, telling me about plays he was writing and those he had written. At the time I had nary a notion of writing one of my own. After my late friend’s passing, I thought about what I had learned in our conversations. I had a sense that I owed him a play. As a lone play wouldn’t constitute a fair effort at unlocking and exploring the potential, I promised myself I’d write no fewer than three. I began to write Ain’t No Place Like Home, the first, in 2006.

SRT: What do you like to write about?

So far, I’ve enjoyed writing about characters on social and economic margins. I try to get them spinning top-like, listen and take notes as they bump into one other, revealing their thoughts, problems, stories, and dreams.

SRT: What’s the best and/or worst advice you’ve received about writing?

Best advice: Go get a pencil and a piece of paper.
Worst advice: Don’t do it.

SRT: Tell us something quirky about yourself.

I have a collection of more than twenty Borsalino fedoras, yet only one head.

SRT: What’s next for you?

Currently, I’m working on a full-length play, the third in a cycle, exploring homelessness and related themes. It will be set in a Goodwill-like job training facility. Hopefully, a strong draft will be rounding out by the time next year’s Writers Group Festival of Staged Readings arrives. Furthermore to that, I’ll probably need to write a comedy.

Danielle.Girard

Staff Picks: 15 Plays to Read Before You Die

May 25th, 2012 by Danielle.Girard

Artistic intern Kaytlin McIntyre gets cozy with Anton Chekhov and Tennessee Williams.

The Western canon of dramatic literature is huge. Which got me thinking…if you can’t read it all, where should you start?

Most  of us theatre makers and theatre enthusiasts hope to read or see a great many of these works during our lifetime, but the reality of life and time constraints usually makes keeping up with this “reading list” difficult. 

Since summer is on the horizon and is generally a time for pleasure reading and catching up on those projects we haven’t attended to yet, I decided to poll SRT staff members about some of their favorite plays to make a “suggested summer reading list.”

Here’s a list of the must-read plays folks mentioned this morning as I walked around the office.

- Lysistrata by Aristophanes

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (and if you don’t have time for all of them, SRT staff suggests the following: HamletA Midsummer Night’s Dream, and/or Macbeth

Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand

- Uncle Vanya by Anton Chekhov 

Private Lives by Noël Coward

- No Exit by Jean-Paul Sartre

A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams

Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett

Equus by Peter Shaffer 

Betrayal by Harold Pinter

- Fences by August Wilson

Our Country’s Good by Timberlake Wertenbaker

The Kentucky Cycle by Robert Schenkkan

Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes by Tony Kushner

Proof  by David Auburn

That’s our unofficial “plays to read before you die” list for today. But we know so many exciting and challenging plays aren’t on this recommended reading list. What plays would you add to the must-read/must-see list?


 

 

 

 

Seattle Repertory Theatre

Playwright Profile: Elizabeth Heffron and The Weatherman Project

May 17th, 2012 by Seattle Repertory Theatre

Seattle Rep Writers Group playwright Elizabeth Heffron.

Stop by Seattle Rep this Friday, May 18 at 3 p.m. to catch the FREE staged reading of Elizabeth Heffron and Kit Bakke’s The Weatherman Project in our PONCHO Forum. This reading marks the third new work presented during our Inaugural Seattle Rep Writers Group showcase, which will present again on June 1 and June 15. 

About the play: How far would you be willing to go to fix the problems you see in your country? In 1968, five young people are about to find out.

We asked Elizabeth to tell us a little about herself, as well as her new play. 

SRT: What inspired you and Kit Bakke to write The Weatherman Project?

Mainly, the events of the current day. It’s amazing to see young people rising up again, and facing, if not the same, then very similar entrenched interests and conflicts. Also, Kit was a part of the Movement, and was underground for several years, so she’s an amazing primary source!

SRT: How long have you been a playwright, and how did you get into playwriting?

Looooong time! Since the mid-90s at least. I got into theater by moving to Seattle. I was going to be a scientist and was armed with my BS in Psychobiology, but then Seattle theater people just suck you in…

SRT: What do you like to write about?

I like to write about the boundaries of science, ethics, and human behavior. I also find myself writing about the consequences of the systematic dismantling of our social safety net, especially those consequences for women. But this play isn’t about any of that, it’s about trying to effect change in the face of what seem like intractable forces.

SRT: What’s the best and/or worst advice you’ve received about writing?

Best advice I’ve gotten is to approach everything as a beginner. Be always beginning. I love that.

SRT: Tell us something quirky about yourself.

Quirky? I’m from St. Louis. St. Louis has quirk down.

SRT: What’s next for you?

My play for one woman, BO-NITA, will be part of the JAW Festival at Portland Center Stage this summer, and Braden Abraham’s directing it! Very excited for this…

Seattle Repertory Theatre

The Perfect Match

May 8th, 2012 by Seattle Repertory Theatre

We’re all looking for the perfect match.

And right now, thanks to a challenge grant from the Seattle Repertory Theatre Foundation, any new or increased gift made before June 30 will be matched, dollar for dollar. Your $50 becomes $100, $100 becomes $200.

In the spirit of a good match, here are some matches that never fail to delight:

Ben & Jerry

Seattle Rep’s Managing Director Benjamin Moore and Artistic Director Jerry Manning are a well-made match. Moore joined the Rep in 1985 as Managing Director, and Jerry (who joined SRT in 2001 as Casting Director and later served as Producing Artistic Director) became the Rep’s Artistic Director in 2010. 

Ben & Jerry’s 


Go ahead. Eat the whole pint. 

Bert & Ernie

What would Sesame Street be without these two? (And Ernie’s rubber ducky of course). 

Peanut Butter & Jelly

A match made in heaven. Or at least in our elementary school lunch boxes.

Sonny & Cher

The unforgettable celebrity duo that sold 80 million records worldwide. 

Peas & Carrots

To quote Forrest Gump, “Me and Jenny goes together like peas and carrots.”

You & Seattle Rep

Ticket sales only cover about half of the cost of producing our work. Support the Rep with a gift of any amount: donate during our match and double your impact. For more information on how to donate, visit our website http://www.seattlerep.org/Support/Donate/.

Thank you for your support!

Seattle Repertory Theatre

Attend the Inaugural Seattle Rep Writers Group Showcase

May 4th, 2012 by Seattle Repertory Theatre

Last November, we launched the Writers Group, a forum for playwrights, as part of our New Play Program.

The five Northwest participants – Emily Conbere, Vincent Delaney, Al Frank, Elizabeth Heffron, and Stephanie Timm – have been hard at work attending biweekly meetings, utilizing Seattle Rep resources and perfecting their plays….and now they’re ready to share them with the community!

Seattle Rep's Writers Group (pictured from left to right): Emily Conbere, Vincent Delaney, Stephanie Timm, Elizabeth Heffron, and Al Frank.

Come on down to Seattle Rep on the following Fridays at 3 p.m. to catch their new works:

May 4 – Foreclosure
by Vincent Delaney, directed by Anita Montgomery 
What happens when your best friends lose their home but refuse to leave it? Foreclosure examines what we really owe our neighbors and takes a sharply comical look at a modern collapse that shows no sign of ending.

May 11 – The Harold Scholarship 
by Emily Conbere, directed by Erin Kraft
After the loss of their son six months prior, Mr. and Mrs. Harold invite the son’s best friend to spend the weekend with them. During this time, they offer him a scholarship with stakes that are exceedingly high.

May 18 – The Weatherman Project 
by Elizabeth Heffron and Kit Bakke, directed by Sheila Daniels
How far would you be willing to go to fix the problems you see in your country? In 1968, five young people are about to find out.

June 1 – Ain’t No Place Like Home 
by Al Frank, directed by Kaytlin McIntyre
Long days, late June. Seattle is heating up. People camping in the I-5 greenbelt known as ‘the jungle’ worry about change. With no place else to go, they’re hoping a peaceful summer will keep them out of the spotlight – at least until after the Fireworks.

June 15 – Rats in the Garden of Eden 
by Stephanie Timm, directed by Kathleen Collins
When Pearl shows up at her younger sister Opal’s doorstep with a suitcase and a box of “sensual products” to sell after a long, mysterious absence, she finds Opal living in an insular world of romance novels and poetry. Rats in the Garden of Eden explores what happens when someone has to choose between fantasy or reality—one leads to madness, the other to inevitable disappointment.

The Writers Group at one of their very first meetings.

More information is available online at www.seattlerep.org/Plays/NewPlays. All play readings will take place at 3 p.m. in Seattle Rep’s PONCHO Forum. They are free and open to the public.

Following this year’s showcase, the writers will begin work on their new plays that they will be presenting next year. Applications for the 2012 – 2014 cycle will be accepted starting this June.  

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